Tuesday, 5 October 2021

The Duchess of Cambridge Visits UCL to Learn About 'Children of the 2020s'

The Duchess of Cambridge stepped out this morning to visit University College London’s Centre for Longitudinal Studies to meet with leading experts involved in the study ‘The Children of the 2020s’.

A "nationally representative birth cohort study", it will closely follow the development of children from nine months to five years. It is understood today's event is one of several Kate will undertake in relation to the endeavour, which follows the launch of the Royal Foundation Centre for Early Childhood last year.

The Duchess arriving.

Speaking ahead of the visit the Duchess said, "Our early childhoods shape our adult lives and knowing more about what impacts this critical time is fundamental to understanding what we as a society can do to improve our future health and happiness. The landmark ‘Children of the 2020s’ study will illustrate the importance of the first five years and provide insights into the most critical aspects of early childhood, as well as the factors which support or hinder positive lifelong outcomes. I am committed to supporting greater in-depth research in this vital area and I’m delighted to be meeting all those behind the study at this early stage."

Kensington Palace said, "The approach of this study has particular resonance with the Duchess and her work on early childhood, as it will look at a wide range of factors that affect children’s development and education in the early years, including the home environment, the community, early years services and the broader social and economic circumstances of the family. The research is the latest in a long line of birth cohort studies in the UK and will begin recruiting up to 8,000 families in January 2022 for babies born in April, May and June 2021."

A Palace spokesperson continued: "Over the last ten years, Her Royal Highness has spent time looking into how challenges in later life such as addiction, family breakdown, poor mental health, suicide and homelessness can have their roots in the earliest years of someone’s life. Through her work with The Royal Foundation Centre for Early Childhood, she is aiming to highlight how what we experience in early childhood shapes the developing brain, which is why positive relationships, environments and experiences during this period are so crucial."

The Duchess had the opportunity to view archive material of historic research dating back almost a century. Among the items she was shown -- a birth questionnaire completed by mothers in 1958.

It included questions about pregnant women's smoking habits. The response offered researchers insight and thus the ability to study the impact of smoking, laying groundwork for a public campaign to spread awareness on the harmful effects for women expecting and a greater understanding of the negative health effects on the population generally.

Lead researcher, Professor Pasco Fearon (UCL Psychology & Language Sciences and Anna Freud Centre), said, “We are extremely excited to welcome HRH The Duchess of Cambridge to UCL to talk and hear more about our Children of the 2020s study today and as it develops over the coming years."

Professor Fearon added: "The study will collect vital information on how children develop during the crucial early years of life. We will be studying their family circumstances and experiences as they grow up, as well as the role of formal and informal childcare and preschool education in their learning and development. We share with Her Royal Highness a commitment to improving children’s development and life chances through high quality research and good early years policy and we believe the Children of the 2020s study will play a really important part of that for this next generation of children."

In discussion with the experts.

Hello! reports:

"We had answers to questions around who looked after the husband while the woman went into hospital," said Professor Goodman.

"Oh, it was different then!" remarked the Duchess.

Kate asked: "Are there other cohort studies we can learn from internationally?"

Told there were similar studies in Scotland, Ireland and across Europe, she remarked: "There have been quite a lot of studies around trauma, but it's hard to measure the positive influences on early childhood. I suppose that’s what this study is going to start to do."

The Duchess also told researchers how she had noticed the impact of social issues closer to home after looking back at four generations of her own family tree.'

The study has been funded for five years, to enable the researchers to answer important scientific and policy questions regarding the determinants of early school success.

I have no doubt Kate will be eager to track the findings and journey of the study in the coming years.


Now a look at Kate's sartorial choices for the visit.


The Duchess repeated a grey plaid ZARA dress first seen in Bradford in January 2020.


The piece was described: "Flowing long sleeve dress featuring a high neck with ties and a V-shaped opening, an elastic inner waist, a detachable belt in matching fabric with a covered buckle, and front button fastening." At the time it was on sale for just £16.


Kate sported her Hugo Boss anthracite embossed leather pumps.

The Duchess accessorised with her Mappin & Webb Empress earrings.




Looking forward to hearing more about the study in the future.

48 comments:

  1. Rebecca - Sweden5 October 2021 at 15:22

    I really like Kates focus on bringing together and getting important people to focus on gathering facts and research. It might seem like a "saying much and doing little" thing with no tangible direct good impact on community (or her image honestly). But the fact is that there are huge research and statistical data gaps around many of these issues and this work that the organizations do can change policy and charity choices for a long time in the future. I really appriciate that. I also appriciate a fully repeated outfit, as we know!

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    1. Well said Rebecca. Kate's approach is very methodical, and I believe she wants to see lasting and meaningful change, all of which takes time if done right. She is not one for a 'flash in the pan' project and has shown us that she is committed to taking the 'baby steps' needed to achieve reach her overarching goal of purposeful results, even at the risk of criticism. I appreciate that.

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  2. Lovely to see Kate out and about again, especially with something that she feels so passionate about.

    But talking about passion I wish somebody on Kate’s team would turn down the hyperboles when talking about her Early Years work.
    “this LANDMARK study…one of a number of cohort studies..”, crucial…vital…
    And I am not saying that this work is not important, but whenever they release something about her Early Years work it sounds like they are trying a tad too hard. And they don’t need to.

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    1. Rebecca - Sweden5 October 2021 at 15:44

      Haha that's a good point. Although, at least it's descriptive because KP has a tendency to leave out VITAL (lol) information in their captions so I'd rather they'll lay it on a bit thick than miss naming the charity haha. But you're right, not every part can be a landmark! They are needed and important and for sure fills in gaps where studies are needed.

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    2. Agreed RachelZA, don't need to pull out all the PR adjectives, the work speaks for itself.

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    3. Considering that a lot of people and organizations tweeted about how important and vital the EY Research center was when it was announced and that the survey she launched was the one of its topic to get the biggest response ever it doesn’t seem hyperbolic to say the work of the RF around this area is crucial.

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    4. From the CLS UCL website

      "The Children of the 2020s Study is a new nationally representative birth cohort study of babies in England which has been commissioned by the Department for Education (DfE). The study will answer important scientific and policy questions regarding the family, early education and childcare determinants of early school success."

      Guess what, if it is new, then it IS a landmark study.

      Border Terrier lover

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    5. @Border Terrier lover
      not exactly. To be considered a landmark study it does not just have to be new. The questions certainly aren't, the scale is impressice though. But I fear it will just bring the same answers that we have heard before. It is just to prove what everybody in the field is already saying for decades. If nothing comes out of it in real action, it's a massive data collection but nothing else.

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  3. Annette New Zealand5 October 2021 at 15:59

    I don't think she is claiming to have done all the research herself. She is drawing attention to it and the first five years are really crucial in a child's development. Interesting that she hasn't carried a clutch purse lately and only wears hats on very formal occasions now. It seems to be only the Queen who sticks to the previous conventions. Kate looks great in this dress but her hair is too long and needs a trim or being tied back.

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  4. I loved the dress the first time Kate wore it, and still do! Loving the mix-up of the anthracite shoes which is a nice new twist, it's a beautiful shoe! Even more importantly, love Kate's passion and commitment to her causes and look forward to seeing her efforts making a difference down the road.

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  5. I don't love her dress but I do love the engagement and am always pleased to see her. I'm sure the research will contribute to the body of knowledge on this subject which, together, is then used to make public policy decisions and help to provide direction for charities, etc. Good cause.

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  6. Love this look. Elegant, en Vogue, subtle.

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  7. I like it when she has no clutch to carry around. She seems so much more confident. At the BOND premiere her hands moved freely and confidently. I like that for her. It is great. Well done Kate.

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  8. I love the work Kate is doing with early years. It is a very crucial time in a humans development. Every time a mass shooting or another type of crime occurs, in almost all cases the criminal came form a dysfunctional family of some sort. Be it divorce, drugs, homelessness etc. I really hope and think Kate’s early years work can help children grow up in a happy environment.

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  9. Kate is really kicking it out of the park these days! I love it when she wears regular brands. This Zara dress is perfect for the occasion and perfect for Kate. Even though sometimes I wonder why at this point Kate continues to wear cheaper clothes? I mean she has all the means in the world. I bet everyone is dying to dress her. Is it old habit dying hard? But even her family is relatively wealthy now and Pippa and Carol also wear some luxury pieces. Do we think it is to please the crowds? I wonder what makes Kate go to Zara if we all know - and she knows it too - that she could go to Dior, Louis Vuitton or say Nordstrom. I love that she does it though! I think she is just so humble and down to earth.
    Ella

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    1. I think Kate has found a good balance. Ironically a celebrity can wear whatever they want and can afford, a Duchess on the otherhand can’t. Yes, every designer would love to dress her, but she will do her image a lot of damage if she goes that way.

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    2. I think she has mastered the difficult art of being appropriately dressed and has found a good balance between designer and affordable clothes. Designer clothes when the occasion requires, usually British brands. She has worn Chanel in France, and recycled but if I remember well, never Dior? She is very careful not to splash her wealth, it wouldn't be appreciated by the public. On the other hand, this a girl that manages to look perfectly put together even in very affordable clothes.

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  10. The importance of the engagement aside simply said, proof positive that you don't have to spend thousands of dollars to look professional and youthful rather then frumpy.

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  11. I like this combination, looks very nice.Hope the next time we see this dress it will be with a little color added, like red shoes or any other color would really make it pop. OMO.

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    1. I agree with you here Anon when I saw the photos I thought how a pop of colour would just give the outfit a bit of a lift. I really like this dress very business like without needing to wear a suit.

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    2. I'd also been thinking what a great look red shoes would be.

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  12. I don't really understand the idea behind the study. It seems obvious that children need certain things to grow up physically and mentally healthy. Head Start was started in 1965 in the US. There are some benefits but they drop off after age 5 when the child leaves the program. Children need healthy families, period. I don't think Kate thinks she is researching -- just promoting. I suspect the palace people are the ones adding the hyperbole. I would expect Kate to have a role of generating support for more low-income housing, mental health resources, drug programs, food programs, health programs, etc. Any improvement she can foster makes it worthwhile. She has no doubt noted the disparity among children in different income levels and sees how children suffer. In my little town, last week two people went onto the town FB page. One person said he and his family owed $3400 and were about to be living in their truck (a church paid their bills). A woman asked if anyone could give her a free purse because she had a job but nothing to carry her things in. Both have asked along the way for money for bills. Both are young. And both have a newborn! That newborn does not need studies -- he/she needs housing, food, and a stable environment. And the supply issue is taking a toll on school meals. School lunch the other day was a small bag of Cheez-Its and a little out-of-date container of applesauce. Many students get no other food than this. I don't know why the US and UK have not figured out what children need 50 or 75 years ago frankly. But kudos to Kate for doing what she can in a time when there continues to be great need. Her dress is just as pretty as an expensive one and I like the shoes very much!

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    1. Allison, children of all times need healthy food and a stable loving environment. How to achieve this is different now from 75 years ago. Also every decade has its blind spots. Lots of surveys were needed to find out that tobacco smoke was bad for children. How many studies shall we need to get that screens are just as bad? Perhaps in 50 years ‘The Children of the 2020s’ will be seen as the turning point for uncovering the traumas our current society is unaware of creating.
      Anyway, I think this is an important initiative and I like how involved Kate is and how knowledgeable she is. One of the professors said it was like speaking to a colleague.

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    2. I actually think the basics of growing healthy children does not change. I do believe that Kate will achieve more by starting with an overarching study than with smaller initiatives aimed at just food insecurity or lack of exercise or inadequate housing, etc. Anything she can do to mobilize resources and attention can only help as many as possible.

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    3. Here’s a large cohort study. It was called the Millennium Cohort Study. A great many predictors for future outcome came out of this study that reinforced findings from other similar studies.

      https://adc.bmj.com/content/104/11/1049

      The sad fact is more working families are in poverty now than in 1996. Things are getting worse for the British middle class with rising taxes and increasing price for just about everything. Wages have declined here. One of my children who currently lives in the EU and has dual citizenship tells me, while he has seen inflation, it’s nothing like here.

      The royals are too late to this. I suspect the palace thought this would be an easy no-brainer for Kate to sink her teeth into. It’s for the children for goodness sake. Unfortunately, it will merely emphasize how another generation is lost while people in power dithers.

      This “ for the for the children” effort is so oversold and used. The Palace has a great deal of soft influence with regards to where it chooses to focus on. For example areas where more governmental spending can make a world of difference. The Palace’s soft power includes the party donors who crave intimate chats, honors, and hard to get tickets to royal venues, etc. The Queen has chosen, when necessary, to hold up and change parliamentary laws to protect the royal family’s many interests.

      Working to alleviate childhood poverty is only political when it’s an inconvenient truth.


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    4. I do think most people and societies have a very good idea what children need. Sadly, this doesn't mean that actions are taken on a bigger scale to provide that. There several factors playing into it. (1) Taking really good care of children is not benefiting anyone monetary straight away.(2) Supporting children ultimately means also supporting the adaults that care for them. Many are not willing to do that because some black sheep might use it for themselves/cheat the system (even though every study shows its a pretty small minority, but we cannot save the 90-95% because we absolutely cannot afford the 5-10% that cheat). (3) Some societies have a big emphasis on "doing it on your own"/"if you are willing you will". Completely turning a blind eye to the fact that the modern world doesn't work like that and that problems are multifaceted. They prefer charity that makes them feel good abozt themselves but does not improve the fundamental situation. (4) It is actually very complicated and problematic to interfere too much much with the right of raising those children. Parents, or whoever is caring for them should have a right to make individual decisions. If your child is a really fussy eater or a very slim child anyway you don't care too much about the greens but tackle appropriate physical development first (and most children grow up to eat very normal even after living on plain pasta and fish fingers for some time). Some children will suffer from too much screen time, others have less problems with it. Bringing up children successfully into independent, happy adults that would be considered nice to be aroung at leayt by some, that are loved and loving can look highly different. It is a fine line to walk when we interfere here with generalisations. (5) All those things are easy enough if you are healthy and employed with an adequate wage and good work hours. I find it sometimes a bit entitled to act is if parents just need to to more of this and that and completely dismiss the realities of their lives. Especially the ones that struggle. Most don`t provide food, support and a loving enviroment by choice but because they can't.

      In the end - we have the answer to most problems. Be it climate change, health, hunger and poverty..... but most people are not willing to give up their lifestyle or rather change their lifestyle permanently to contribute and governments/parties won't do it because they wouldn't get elected.

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    5. Anonymous at 19:15, I don't think the Palace decided children would be an easy task for Kate. IMO, she is the one who is interested, and with her eyes wide open. From the beginning I was struck by her choice of charities. Not glamorous and popular causes. Addiction. Hospices. Place2b. Then mental health. Here is someone with common sense. And she wants to make a difference. Beginning with the beginning, early years. I am not sure everyone knows what is the best for children. Even on this blog there are different opinions. A scientific study doesn't come amiss. And it seems child poverty is a reality in the UK as is inequality. Her impact is twofold: the long game to change the future generations and the drawing attention to the reality of children right now. She has put the subject in the limelight, like she did mental health. Who talked about mental health 10 years ago? And about early years 5 years ago?

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    6. My goodness.
      I suspect the palace thought this would be an easy no-brainer for Kate to sink her teeth into

      If she wanted to do some no brainer thing she could easily stick her name to something and sell it.

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    7. Natacha, I would gently say many people have been advocating for mental health long before the Duchess or Will and Harry started their endeavor. It’s not a slight to Kate to say this. It doesn’t take anything away from Kate’s effort either. We cheer for her and with her. Many people on the ground are working with limited budget, resources and trained personnel to deliver social services. We fall short. The frustration is real and it’s morale busting.

      There isn’t much confusion about what will improve these children’s lives. Reports after reports, many of them from the various ministries and academia over the years have made similar findings and recommendations. If you listen to speeches by various royals over the years addressing this matter, they too are aware of the needs and solutions. We know what works. And what doesn’t. The frustration is due to the lack of actions and delayed actions.

      Kate can spend the next 5 years studying this and can receive reams of fascinating data. Believe me, I’ve gone to many trainings with colleagues, participated in surveys and various studies and poured through many findings and recommendations. Things that will help working families and their children for example are better and more affordable child care providers, better national paid parental leave policy. These were issues 20 years ago. They remain problematic issues today. A recent OECD study showed the UK has some of the most expensive chid care costs. We don’t have enough of them and many working families can’t afford them. We can learn from other counties like the Scandinavian ones where childcare is funded by the state and educators are well trained, unlike here where it’s up to the families to find private services and where workers are poorly paid. Such care for example in Finland covers the child from birth combined with generous family leave policy.

      The UK is a rich country. It’s striking that despite such wealth and stable governmental institutions, other European countries are able to do more for their children and deliver better outcomes.







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    8. Maybe Anon 23:12, that's exactly what Kate plans to do with this study (and perhaps others), make a bigger difference and have a greater impact, by helping to provide data that CAN and WILL change legislation within the UK to do more for their children and delivery better outcomes. Change like what you are talking about does not come overnight, although it should, and it isn't going to happen on Kate's 'say so', nor is it in her power or authority. I don't think some give Kate enough credit; she is patient, steady, and very systematic in her approach and I believe her long-term goal is just exactly what you are voicing a concern about, and that's moving agencies, government towards funding these critical programs. While it is too early to truly know, I would venture it will be her legacy. Progress is slow, but one thing this pandemic has shown us is the vulnerability of people and their situations and they aren't going away, in fact they have been exacerbated by Covid and its complex series of side effects, both physically and socially, we can no longer 'ignore' it as a society. As frustrating as the system appears to be, if one voice can be heard and used to help make a difference to move in the direction it needs to go, then I applaud her efforts and dedication to trying to achieve that goal. It's a good steady start.

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    9. I do think that Kate's work is important. On the other hand we still have to take it with a grain of salt. I mean - she is not a scholar or scientist. She is a philantropist and a royal/nationwide representative, but let's be realistic here. We can't expect that Kate will conduct some scientific experiments or lead academic teams. She is a great and thoughtful and educated royal but still, there are others who really work in research and we shouldn't forget about them. And about the fact that they are doing researches much more extensively than we can hear about during a royal engagement.
      Ella

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    10. At this point, just like climate change, there isn’t time for more studies over the significance of early childhood education and development are. That premise is proven and accepted universally in the UK.

      The ticking time bomb here, just like climate change, is we are short on time to make changes so we don’t lose another generation because we dithered. The UK has been addressing this subject matter since the 1990’s when Kate was a tween.

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    11. 00:07, It seems the UK hasn't done a lot about it. Kate is trying to get things going, it is disingenuous to blame her for what successive governments all of them aware of the problem since the 1990 have failed to do.

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  13. I am not a big fan of the look. The dress is very busy with the pattern, pleats and bow. Together with her hairstyle it really swamps her. And the grey shoes make it look overwhelmingly grey and drab. Hair back or up and bold shoes with a bold clutch would have made it much more lively and easier on the eye. Kate does looks better in more bold outfits that still maintain an classic element (cut or details: like the gold cape gown or the purple suit). That`s why she always made the traditional coat dresses work for her so incredibly well.

    I agree with RachelZA that they need to stop laying it on so thick. But I think it has to do with blurry lines in how involverd she is. She met people doing a study to show interest and support. But the study didn't emerge out of her projects but through the DfE. That's a very different involvemnt than the Early Years survey. That was more of a mood/mindeset test of the public than a "landmark, scientifically important study" because that will be taken into consideration in the big decisions by the big players. Also a different level of involvment is the Royal Foundation Centre of Early Childhood. But her PR and the reporting on it often mix those levels up and that is very confusing sometimes.

    Wiliam and Kate are really trying hard to change the way of royal work for some years now. Heads Together was a first try and showed clearly where they had to improve. Earthshot and Early Years are set up better. They try to swap public engagements/visits with connecting players and raising awarness for the big topic and less the individual charity itself (even though I believe this will always be part of it). I do think they still have quite some way to go but this will very probably the future of a working BRF. Especially when they will be down to six working members soon enough.
    C.

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    1. Annette New Zealand8 October 2021 at 17:14

      Exactly right. They obviously don't want to be just opening things with an unexceptional speech and unveiling plaques. The Queen has done that for hundreds of causes and we don't really think she has any particular interests except horses and dogs so her efforts make very little difference. However she is also Head of State and therefore is entitled to some financial contribution from the taxpayer. Prince Charles on the other hand has made a real difference with his various initiatives. William and Kate aren't social workers but they can give publicity to worthy causes and celebrate worthy endeavours as Charles does. I expect that the general public will support a future cutback in the number of "working" Royals and staff. (In NZ we have a derogatory term "hangers on" for them.) Of course there is nothing stopping these extras from any sort of voluntary activity, but they will have to show they are not all dependent on the taxpayer when there is so much real need around.

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    2. I disagree about Prince Charles’ contribution. Common people can’t afford to live like Charles and run our car on milk by products. God knows, it’s tough enough to afford petrol, much less trying to find it these days. That’s the reality. As much as we want green, there’s a lot of greenwashing going on here. That’s why I distrust this refurbished image. Look I know he’s going to be King, but his lectures run contrary to his lifestyle when it comes to the family very big carbon footprint. I don't think all this pretense is going to work out as well as he thinks, despite latching onto David Attenborough’s coattail here. The funniest thing is you know who has the smallest footprint for eons? Poor people (and poor countries). They have to conserve, reuse and recycle, eat a more plant based diet (cheap meat products with fillers) because they have no choice and no money to burn to be green and be smug about it.
      -media watcher

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  14. I think that it is time for some new pictures of the Cambridge children. Pictures of George, Charlotte and Louis with carved Halloween pumpkins would be nice to see.

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  15. I always enjoy seeing the Duchess of Cambridge exploring work she is clearly passionate about. Her particular dedication to the early years work I feel could have lasting and significant impacts for many generations to come. It's quiet work that may go overlooked and unnoticed for the impact it could have.

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  16. There are studies within the UK and internationally about early childhood development already.

    When the government embarks on another austerity university credit cut like cutting £20/week, it’s known this will dump more children into care. This cut will trigger eviction, debt, longer lines at the food bank and more photo ops for the royals.

    If there’s a study that affected people want most is what will make their children’s lives better. To many people, the answers are so obvious. Food, safe housing, safe care when parents or guardians are at work, better education, free college and trade schools that many European countries already offer. European countries with their own monarchy managed to offer superior early childhood care and education and the social compact continues onto adulthood.

    It’s the younger generations who will be Kate’s future. She shouldn’t stand around with academics who don’t live the lives of the people they are studying. People are more than subjects to be studied or appeared as cheering subjects.

    Kate has an opportunity to stand apart, be stronger, real, and the future queen England needs. I think William suffers from birthright disorder, like his father. Too much has been given and too little asked. Kate doesn’t need to be like Diana. Kate does have to show that the welfare of the people comes first.

    I think the monarchy lost sight of that priority. It is now a poorly aging institution afraid of its own shadow, relying on old men or younger, predatory men who care more about themselves, their fortune, than the people the monarchy serves. No glamour or scripted walk-though can hide the rough edges of such severe neglect. It makes me weep and I am a royalist.

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    1. This this this.

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    2. I think is working to show that the welfare of the people comes first, and I don't believe she is trying to be like Diana. She is making her way in a manner that is in her style and will have long lasting effects down the road.

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  17. I prefer this styling of the dress over the first time. Love the earrings especially! I’m looking forward to seeing the early years work evolve in the future- my undergrad was in early childhood education. Sue

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  18. I think the Duchess looks beautiful in this repeat. Very smart and business like. She's working here. Regarding the PR around her work, it's the world that we live in. Other people are using the best PR in the business, just to stay relevant. I like to think of her like her late Mother in law Diana. Shining her light on different charities. Mental health, Hold still, early years. In saying that, i wonder after the Bond premiere does she even need PR. Just like Diana, Kate stepped out and the world looked. S. ☺

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  19. Thanks for sharing this! I’m delighted with this information, where such important moments are captured. All the best!

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  20. In the US in 2013 (prepandemic), 2.5 million children (half under 5 years) were homeless. Sociologists have been studying it for ages; they found it's hard to break out of cycles for many reasons. Some cities spend tax dollars breaking down homeless camps, expecting people with nothing to just move out of view. More may become homeless soon as the moratorium on eviction has ended. Congress put aside a lot of money to pay landlords but many landlords won't do the paperwork and prefer to evict families, tossing out kids in the middle of doing their homework. That's one reason I get frustrated with studies. However, I think Kate's survey is very useful to get an idea of what people believe about early childhood. Once the basic needs are meant, certainly issues such as addiction, mental health, etc. should be addressed.

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  21. Thank you Charlotte for an interesting post. Having read all the comments my take is :-
    We live in a society that is data driven and requires studies and data to inform decision and action at all levels.

    Very basic needs safety food warmth are universal other needs are driven by society in a time and place. 21st century US UK Europe Africa etc are all very different with different needs that are different from needs of say post world war two
    Perhaps as an example basic education in Africa is not universal and needs addressing
    In the UK problems associated by both parents working and too much screen time are issues needing addressing.

    Catherine is highlighting the needs of the whole spectrum of young children from those in abject poverty to wealthy each of whom have needs.

    The Queen has lived through and adapted to a century of life and through all that time has remained a constant reflecting the changing lives of her peoples. Charles should be given credit for identifying and focusing on the issues of great importance for our times climate change and waste many decades before they became prominent.

    Each generation of Royals has built on the previous generations work but changed the direction tosuit changing times and needs. This is how I see both William and Kate's work and it does have relevance.

    Kate's fashion is important as for the most part we as women enjoy fashion and discussion of fashion. Love or hate her look it is something that binds us together. I like the mix- repeats, affordable and high end. Last week the unforgettable golden girl and today the understated working girl. All colour and leaven in what has been a very different two years. And on that note whenever I think life is a bit tough at present I open Hold Tight and remind myself of how tough it has been for others.

    Please take care all you and stay safe. We still have quite a long road ahead of us

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  22. The Queen has lived a long life. The monarchy hasn’t evolved very much. It’s still running in the 20th century and its fear is turning the clock backward, not forward. This is the problem you run into when you have such an aging behemoth, full of people recruited because of similar background, going to the same schools, same clubs and social circle, sharing similar mentality and prejudices. I don’t confuse having instagram account or you tube channel as examples of modernizing. Just because people went from landline to cell phone and texting doesn’t mean they are evolving for the better. Look at the craziness on-line these days. What’s keeping the monarchy from evolving and keeping up with its citizens and national and global changes are its attitude and actions which can also be inactions.
    Diana was the last fresh airing of the palace and it has been running scare of another Diana ever since.

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  23. Hmm the duchess really good in her work and healthy living child support will definitely have a great impact to child if parents and teachers and knows what their children been through

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