Wednesday, 3 August 2016

Kate Loves: Interior Décor

We're continuing our Kate Loves series with a much requested post focusing on a topic many of us enjoy: interior décor. Since renovations at Kensington Palace and Anmer Hall commenced, there has been considerable interest in Kate's choices when it comes to decorating her homes. Fast forward to today, both projects are successfully completed and we've had the opportunity to see glimpses into the finished results. How did the Duchess decorate her homes? Where did she draw inspiration? How does one marry the needs of a palace which will host heads of state with providing homely surroundings for two growing children?


Following the royal wedding in 2011, William and Kate were dividing their time between Anglesey in Wales, where William was working as a search and rescue pilot, and Nottingham Cottage, a two-bedroom house in the grounds of Kensington Palace. When choosing their future home, they reportedly looked at a state apartment in St. James's Palace, but both agreed they wanted to live at KP. William was said to be considering Apartment 8, Diana's old home, where he and Harry spent much of their childhoods, however, when the Cambridges visited Princess Margaret's former home, Apartment 1A, they both loved it.


A source told The Mail on Sunday: "Kate particularly adored the private walled garden because she loves gardening, and she just thought the house had so much potential. She also liked the fact it was so close to Kensington High Street." The twenty-room apartment had been uninhabited since 2002 and would require extensive renovation before the couple could move in. In terms of interior décor, many of the rooms were still painted pink, turqouise and blue. Shades Margaret favoured since the sixties when London's most eclectic social set would gather there.


Obviously decorating a palace comes with a different set of requirements than most homes. This was very much on Kate's mind when she and William teamed up with Denmark's Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary to visit UNICEF's emergency supply centre in Copenhagen.


The Duchess was delighted to be given a tour of Amalienborg Palace by Crown Princess Mary during the visit and was said to be hugely impressed. A Danish royal court source said: "Mary showed them around their apartment at Amalienborg Palace and they loved the way they had combined their collection of modern art with antique furniture, Kate was truly inspired and wants to use some similar ideas in some of the rooms at Kensington Palace."


Along with enormous crystal chandeliers, the palace is also home to a series of murals and artworks created by Danish contemporary artists, among them the Icelandic-Danish sculptor, Olafur Eliasson. Another, by artist John Kørner, is themed around Afghanistan and shows camels, stately palm trees and soldiers silhouetted against a colourful Afghan sunset. The project is a stellar example of how to combine tradition with modernity.


With plans for renovations at Apartment 1A making headlines, it was revealed the Queen had gifted Anmer Hall to the couple as their country home. Located on the Sandringham estate, the late-Georgian house dates from the late 18th century and features two storeys and an attic with dormer windows. The news meant extensive work on both properties would be undertaken concurrently.


With an eye for interiors, art history graduate Kate oversaw both projects, choosing everything from lamps to exquisite pieces from the Royal Collection to adorn her homes. Frequent sightings of the Duchess shopping emerged; below we see Kate leaving Turnell & Gigon loaded with samples and swatches.


The fabrics store holds the prestigious royal warrant and supplies some of the finest original and most sought-after fabrics from around the world, alongside a comprehensive range of wallcoverings and trimmings.


Kate paid several visits to the Design Centre at Chelsea Harbour, a one-stop haven for home furnishings with five hundred brands in a three-storey, modern showroom. A source told People: "I think she likes to pop in every now and again to look for inspiration. She is always by herself and very low-key. She browses and stops for a coffee." On one recent trip, Kate looked at traditional lighting at Vaughan Designs, fabrics at Sanderson (the arts-and-crafts Morris and Co. range was a favourite), as well as fabric at Mulberry Home where she was particularly taken with a jade green and teal paisley stripe material.


A shop assistant at Ann Sacks, which specializes in luxury tile and stone products, said: "She was looking at the sort of thing you would imagine for a period property – reclaimed terra-cotta flooring from France and a particular reclaimed stone used in French castles that she liked too."


Simon Knight, owner of Cotswold Oriental Rugs shared a few words about meeting Kate with People:


"Instead of hiring a royal interior designer, she wants to furnish it in her own style, because she wants this to be her own family home."
Knight spent time with the Duchess of Cambridge when she visited his antique rug store and purchased several Turkish kilims – a type of flat tapestry woven carpet. "She was looking for things for bedrooms," he said, "so she wanted softer pastel shades rather than strong colors."
After first doing her research online, she came into the store armed with the specific stock codes. "She knew exactly what she wanted to look at, as she had looked at my website," said Knight. "She is very hands-on and down-to-earth, helping to get things out. She really wants to be involved."

The Duchess was photographed shopping at Chelsea-based fabric printing company Bernard Thorp when she was expecting Prince George. She spent time browsing before choosing beige and brown handmade fabrics that cost £131.76 per metre, and purchased cream and light brown herring-bone material for the curtains in a corridor.


Kate was spotted several times purchasing furnishing accessories, dark blue bath towels and gingham hangers at Zara Home. One shop assistant noted: "She definitely likes blue. Everything she seemed to look at was blue but not for babies – she must just like the colour." Kate was also spotted buying items at John Lewis including their Gingham Check Tablecloth. The classic wipe-clean cloth retails for £12 per metre, and also comes in blue and sage.

John Lewis

Of course, decorating one's home rarely goes exactly according to plan. It was reported Kate was left very unhappy with a decision to paint one of the rooms purple. More from Vanity Fair:

'Kate is said to be "dissatisfied" with the color of the walls in one of the rooms. She had attempted "to save money" by getting "Dulux paints to match the Farrow & Ball color palette," but now is regretting the decision as "one room came out with a horrible, unexpected purple tinge." Yikes! We are imagining the color of a bruise on a thigh, or a rotten eggplant, and it is displeasing. Kate is reportedly blaming this headache on her pregnancy hormones, as she planned the design of the room when she was pregnant with Prince George.'

The Duchess enlisted in-demand interior designer Ben Pentreath - who has worked with everyone from Prince Charles to Sarah Jessica Parker. More from a 2015 Hello! story:

'He loves classic country houses but isn't afraid to bring them up to date with a splash of colour and bright wallpaper. Nor is 43-year-old Ben afraid of mixing antique furniture with modern accessories. It was the designer who is said to have encouraged Kate to step out of her comfort zone. So while parts of the house, including George's nursery and the drawing room are traditional and classic, the other areas reflect this bold new approach. For instance, Kate had the dining room painted jewel green. She also requested that a new, more child-friendly kitchen was installed.'

With both projects successfully completed, Anmer became the family's primary home for the time being, whilst Kensington Palace serves as their London residence. With much speculation on the inside of both homes, we've been lucky enough to get a peek inside over the past year. Kate's family photographs of George and two-week-old Charlotte taken at Anmer offered a glimpse into the neutral palette the Duchess selected. George and Charlotte were photographer on a pristine cream sofa, which was complemented by a pair of beautiful curtains - possibly made with fabric from one of the aforementioned brands.


Last November, Kensington Palace released new photos of an adorable six-month-old Princess Charlotte sitting on a green-checked armchair.


What Kate Wore reader Nancy noted the fabric is Brunschwig & Fils Tresors de Jouy Carsten Check. The material sells for $300 a yard and is made in India. Below we see the fabric in Carsten Check, Pale Blue and Cream.


For Princess Charlotte's first birthday photos we were offered another peek inside Anmer. Charlotte sits on a wicker chair in the photo and in the background we see a beige striped couch with a selection of cushions.


In another photo, looking ever-so-cute, Charlotte is pictured leaning on a chiaviri chair with a pink cushion. Anmer Hall is beautifully decorated from what we've seen, and very much embodies the look of a traditional country home.


We certainly got more than we bargained for when William, Kate and Harry welcomed President Obama and First Lady Michelle to Kensington Palace for dinner in April.


Not only did we see Prince George greeting the President of the United States in his pyjamas...


The world was given an unprecedented insight into William and Kate's home when photos from the Drawing Room were released, seen for the first time since Apartment 1A was refurbished. The room combines the trappings one would expect in a palatial lounge, such as antiques from the Royal Collection, with family photos, drinks and books. It's a modern palace, marrying tradition and modernity, and very much seems like a family home. I expect this is something Kate was eager to achieve: a drawing room suitable for entertaining world leaders, that could easily provide a background for drinks with friends and family. In all photos you'll notice a stylish mix of modern and traditional décor.


Let's take a look inside! In this photo, of Kate and Michelle Obama chatting, the pair are sitting on a cream sofa with a floral cushion and a green velvet cushion, reportedly by South African interior designer Kelly Hoppen. The use of different fabrics and cushions adds a homely feel to the room.


A beautiful bouquet by royal florist Simon Lycett. A fragrant bouquet of fresh flowers adds an incredibly welcoming touch to any room.


On the couple's silver drinks tray: a bottle of Smirnoff Vodka and a bottle of Gordon's Gin alongside several mixers.


Sitting on a side table beside William and President Obama - a scented candle thought to be by Jo Malone.


And Nick Brandt's book, On This Earth, A Shadow Falls, is said to capture the vanishing grandeur and beauty of east Africa with widescreen panoramic shots of majestic animals and landscapes.

Amazon

Items from the royal collection include a persian rug, said to be worth an estimated £30,000.


Kate chose a painting by Dutch artist Aelbert Cuyp to adorn the wall of the drawing room. It was purchased by George IV in 1809 and may have previously belonged to Benjamin West. I imagine selecting paintings was one of the most enjoyable aspects of the process for art history graduate Kate.

The Royal Collection

More on the painting from the Royal Collection:

'The real or would-be aristocratic character of Cuyp’s clientele explains the popularity in his oeuvre of riding and hunting portraits. It has been suggested that the nobleman here, wearing black and attended by his groom and page, is a portrait and may be identified as Willem van Beveren, son of Cornelis van Beveren, who was knighted by Louis XIII in 1635. The background architecture is certainly of exactly the type used in the equestrian portraits ; however the man in black is half hidden by his horse and upstaged by his page, neither of which suggests the prominence one might expect from a portrait.
 The alternative is that this is a general evocation of journeying south. The scale of this painting may seem rather grand for an equestrian caprice rather than an equestrian portrait, but in fact the decorative schemes which became a feature of Dutch painting in the later years of the seventeenth century are almost always grand in scale and imaginary in subject.'

A selection of family photos are on display around the room including a photo of Michael and Carole Middleton at the royal wedding, William and Harry with Diana as children, and photos of William and Kate from their pre-engagement days.


It would appear the black and white photo of Kate was taken at the 2006 wedding of Laura Parker Bowles.


An array of lamps create a relaxed atmosphere in the room. It's interesting to note, whilst they all work impeccably well together, they are not identical.


The addition of the personal touches on the evening were a major winner for me. It was a lovely gesture to have the rocking horse and the toy dog the Obamas gave George on display, and showed an enormous level of consideration.


What is your take on the drawing room at Kensington Palace? I think it's beautifully done, and as anyone who has has decorated their own home knows, it's no mean feat to take so many individual pieces and create a stylish, clean and comfortable place with just the right ambience. There's a plethora of elements, from lamps to paintings, photos to contemporary perspex side tables, a persian rug, and so much more. Yet they all sit seamlessly.  I think you'll agree, Kate has more than achieved her interior decorating goals!

122 comments:

  1. Beautiful post! Thank you.

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  2. Great post. I am happy to re-visit (pardon the pun!) both KP and AH. Charlotte, I do agree with your "seamless" observation. I love the traditional, cozy feel of KP and what I would refer to as French country of AH. Both homes have a very happy, warm and inviting feel to them.

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  3. Sarah Maryland USA3 August 2016 at 01:36

    I didn't like all the lamps in the drawing room. Why not one overhead light with one or two lamps?
    Also, she is awfully brave to have white furniture in a house with kids and a dog
    But I also love Kate a style. I love the light and airy feel of the rooms at Amner and my bedroom is similar in design with white furniture and light green comforter and pillows

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    1. Sarah, my husband says the same thing about lamps all over! I just explain to him that I like the different vibes I get from the different lamps and the variety of lighting options (I move them all. the. time. Depends on the mood!). Also, for me, overhead lighting creates glare/shadows that are quite challenging. Sam

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    2. Rebecca - Sweden3 August 2016 at 06:58

      I can see your point. But generally, the "rule" for lights is to have around 7 light sources on low areas to create a cozy feel. The mistake people often does is putting just one light from the top. It might light the room better but is generally seen as a less cozy and less fancy way of lighting a room. It's all down to personal taste ofc!

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    3. She may have a different sitting room where the kids can enjoy it a little more. One that is not a white couch.

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    4. Rebecca, I agree with you. Personally, I want the sun above my head during the day, and softer, "mood" lighting at night (except the kitchen and bathrooms, lol). My living room is much smaller than the one we're privy to here and I have three lamps in it. :) They all work together and I love the warm glow.

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    5. I think when you light everything (overhead light) you light nothing. The lamps provide ambiance and coziness.

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  4. Great post I love Princess Mary and Frederik and they have styled their home beautifully. Mary is so elegant no wonder she can do anything with grace.

    Thanks again Charlotte

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    1. I am not a fan of Prince Frederik and Princess Mary's decor. The blue colour is beautiful, as are the high swagged windows, the mirror, the crown moulding and the spectacular chandelier. But I don't like the mix of the very modern couch and the orange table with the rest of the room. I prefer to keep periods consistent and not go for an eclectic look.

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    2. Bonnie, I do agree with your impression. For some people, W&K's apartment may appear to be cluttered, but to my eye it is a better balance of the very traditional and more contemporary touches.

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    3. I agree Bonnie. Eclectic is very difficult to get right. In this case it didn't work at all, IMO.

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    4. Julia from Leominster5 August 2016 at 06:21

      Well anyone who finds this cluttered have better never come to my house! - I find this actually quite restrained - far more so than the queen's private rooms or what we have seen of Clarence House or Diana's apartment. I don't know if this comes from William and Kate's taste, modern fashion or a wish to not have this room be too personal.

      I love Frederik and Mary's mixture of modern and old and that very Scandinavian shade of blue but it is a very Danish look - taking note of that country's huge contribution to modern furnishings and style, while William and Kate's is far more traditionally British. Both suit their occupants.

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  5. I love this post! What a pleasure to read. So interesting. Thank you!

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  6. Great post, thank you! Amazing she wasn't paralyzed, with a big budget and choice of royal pieces as well. Just went about picking what she thought would be beautiful and comfortable...I really admire her confidence - good for her!

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  7. Wonderful post! I am not a fan of mixing super modern pieces (the lucite table) with period pieces but it's a beautiful room. I like that the artwork has some history and is from the royal collection. Any insight into how many pieces she had to choose from? Where is the royal collection housed? Basement (haha) of BP? Did Kate just snatch a piece off a wall someplace or did she select from pieces no one else wanted? Very interesting to me. Future post????

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    1. good questions, 02:45.

      That would be fun to know.
      Hopefully that will be a future blog topic.

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    2. Agree, I'd love to hear LOTS more about the royal art and decor collections. Thank you, Charlotte, for the wonderful posts! We appreciate you!!

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    3. Definitely a subject for possible future post! I'm very interested as well :)

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    4. Yes! What an interesting post that would be!

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    5. The Royal Collection is "housed" throughout all of the royal residences in England and Scotland, with the bulk being at Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace and Hampton Court. Many pieces from the collection are on loan to museums in the UK or are included in traveling exhibits.
      Since the Queen's Gallery, which is open to the public, is housed at Buckingham Palace (there's another in Edinburgh), I would expect that's where the art that is made available for the members of the royal family to borrow are also kept.

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    6. Julia from Leominster4 August 2016 at 18:52

      Virtually all museums have more art than they can display and have storage facilities where the art is kept in temperature and light controlled protection - and are all photographed and documented. And of course, almost all museums lend works out and most borrow too for special exhibits - such as in the recent V & A exhibit on Botticelli which included the Minerva from the Uffizi - a most rare and beautiful piece not often lent.

      The Queen's Gallery has rotating exhibits as I recall, so it wouldn't be like paintings taken off the wall for William and Kate. I imagine some paintings would be too precious for a loan into a family home but a huge amount would be available to be chosen from.

      (Any time I'm tempted to think "poor Kate" I remember she has unique and extraordinary opportunities like this - so much can and should be expected from her. With great privileges come responsibilities - paintings from the Royal Collection are part of the treasure of the nation.)

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    7. Julia, I do not believe that Kate would want anyone to think of her as "poor Kate", but I am uncomfortable when references to the perks she has are used to minimize or even dismiss the negatives. At the end of the day, she is a human being with feelings, strengths and weaknesses like the rest of us.

      I would not trade my independence and anonymity for the Mona Lisa.

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    8. Julia from Leominster5 August 2016 at 06:36

      Well, quite honestly I wouldn't trade it for the Mona Lisa either but there are some paintings out there.... to paraphrase G & S, I have a little list...

      Seriously, I would be sorely tempted - if offered my choice from the royal collections - not just paintings but furniture and porcelain, not to mention access to the palaces and their gardens and grounds - I'm quite a homebird and could happily not venture far outside palace fences, except for engagements - but Mr Leo came calling and Andrew - my nearest contemporary - chose Fergie - and you know, I'm glad for it! I don't think we would have suited at all to say the least!

      The worst thing for me would be to hear criticism of my spouse - but politicians have that much worse than royals.

      It is not a private life but Kate had a lot of time to decide it was the life she wanted. I'm sure Chelsy loved Harry as much but she didn't want that kind of restriction on her freedom - although she's seeking publicity now with her jewellery.

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    9. Julia, I have always wondered whether the Chelsy chose freedom over royal restrictions version isn't the modern equivalent of Camilla got away (and married APB)...with both scenarios not addressing the issue of suitability. Camilla would not have been suitable back in the day and,IMHO, if H&C had a multifaceted relationship and she loved him enough to understand and accept what came with the package, they would have made it work.

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    10. Good point, royalfan. She may not have been that committed or involved. Not at
      the level Kate was.Diana was a tough act to follow in more than one way.

      I don't think-from his behavior, that he was mature enough for committment and obviously neither was she. She remains fancy free to this day. No ring on her finger that
      we know of. I doubt the royal life style was a stumbling block. She's run with that crowd all her life. Judging from what can be gleaned from remarks from and
      about her, I doubt anyone would intimidate Chelsea.
      I also don't think she would have been criticised as much as Kate, simply
      because Chelsea was likely more acceptable by some of the royals than Kate
      initially was.
      It was the hounding by media and photographers and lack of privacy that was
      mentioned as the breaking point. She was able to tolerate it for awhile, but in time, I think it wore her down. If she had been as committed to Harry as Kate is to William, as royalfan said, they could have "made it work."
      It still doesn't excuse the intrusive media and there is no island retreat
      to offer respite anymore.
      I hope they are finding some now in France or wherever.

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    11. Why wouldn't have Camilla been a suitable bride for Charles if had so chose?

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  8. Charlotte, this is the post I've been waiting for, and you have done a wonderful job! Thank you. Sam

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  9. This was a lovely post, Charlotte - thank you so much! I love the light, neutral tones the Duchess has used. I decorated my (very!) small apartment with pastel colours as well, and couldn`t believe how much it appeared to open up the space.

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    1. From the photo of their apartment when they are greeting the President and First Lady,

      it seems that that attic and the basement might be used for more than storage as there are lights on in both and look those look like they are occupied. That would be a lot of wasted space if they aren't using it for more than storage. They don't need that much storage. I had read somewhere that they have personnel living in the basement level and perhaps an office or two. How much square footage is apartment 1A with all four levels?

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  10. Julia from Leominster3 August 2016 at 06:15

    While I loved Margret's rhapsody in blue and also loved the sitting room in Apartment 8, this is admittedly far more William and Kate - and most elegant and comfortable looking.

    (Although, I suspect Lupo is banned here - it wouldn't do for muddy spaniel paws.) It has a very homely feel without being too personal, and is gracious without being pretentious. I like how that magnificent painting anchors the fairly neutral shades in the room - the Cuyp is a stunning painting, even if a trifle controversial - I can see why William and Kate chose it. The modern tables make handing over coasters unnecessary. I like the fact it doesn't scream "decorator" - whether one was used or not.

    But I confess I wouldn't be paralyzed to have a budget and the queen's collection of furniture and paintings at my disposal - I would be in ecstasy. I have to admire Kate's restraint - I would probably overdo it.

    Mary and Frederic's home is delightful as well. There is a new magazine - quite beautifully done - called Crown - that has an article showing photos of several of the royal homes - the styles are very interesting.

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  11. Rebecca - Sweden3 August 2016 at 07:01

    Wow, what a great post Charlotte! It must have taken alot of research so thank you very much for the time you have put into this!!

    I really like their decorating style. Classic, cozy but not stuffy. It must be hard to decorate these places! I remember how the Queen loved deciding how Britannia would be decorated from scratch. The only home she has been able to fully choose how to design herself. It must be very nice to have these big, luxurious places, but it also provides new challenges with what you can't change and making things fit into the general style while still being modern. I like the way they have seemed to balance it!! :)

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  12. They must have at least seven fireplaces on each of the two residential levels as they have seven chimneys. Considering all four levels seem to be occupied that is a large living space.

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  13. I enjoyed this post and appreciate the level of detail. However I do think that if you are going to discuss the painting specifically, it is necessary to include the title and reference to the questions it raised when these photos showing it so prominently displayed were released - The Negro Page.

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    1. I remember reading an article after the President's visit, saying that they had to hide the title of the picture so the POTUS or FLOTUS wouldn't notice it.

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    2. First, I imagine the Obamas are familiar with the painting and its title. It would be pointless to hide the title.
      Secondly, it would be interesting to know the original source of that story.
      Thirdly, the Obamas would likely not be offended by the painting. Michelle
      Obama has been quite open about the slavery aspect of part of her heritage.
      The story is insulting to both the Cambridges and the Obamas.
      Why not just replace the painting? Covering the title would draw attention to it. They wouldn't notice the child was Negro?
      A ridiculous story, yet popular in some forums.

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    3. The link on where I read it.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3558623/Royals-hide-word-negro-palace-painting-Obama-visit.html

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    4. Emily, thanks for the link. The source doesn't surprise me, however.
      For one thing, Negro is Not "the N-word." Whoever wrote that story doesn't
      know much about American history.
      The whole premise of the story is false and more or less makes it obvious the
      story was made up.
      It is interesting to understand how such a story came about.
      anon 16:19

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  14. Very interesting in- depht. Great, as usual

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  15. I love the warm glow from all the lamps. The KP drawing room is very much in my style of decorating. I dislike all the bland neutral rooms I see in magazines today. The glimpses of Anmer seem a bit too white to me, though I like the fabrics Kate used. She is obviously a talented decorator.

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    1. I LOVE what we can see of Anmer. I'm not sure how practical the color scheme is for someone like me that is prone to spilling things and with an energetic dog that enjoys lounging on furniture, but Anmer looks so peaceful, cozy, and relaxing.

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  16. As interior decorating is a big interest of mine, more than clothing, I enjoyed this post very much. How I wish I had the budget she has! This reminds me of a question I had about the photos of Prince George that were recently released. While most people wantedi information on the clothes he was wearing, I was more interested in the blanket/throw that was on the ground in the photo of George and Lupo. Does anyone have any information on that?

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    1. Pam,

      If you google Photos of Apartment 1A or Photos Kensington Palace apartments you will find an aerial photo that shows who is in the various apartments there. Very nice. Maybe Charlotte could include that?

      Also there are photos online that show what the interior of Amner Hall looked like from the former tenants there. They give an idea of the floor plan and such. Perhaps Charlotte could also include those?

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  17. Maybe Pendleton.

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  18. If you google Apartment 1A or apartments Kensington Palace you will find an aerial full of the apartment complex there that designate who lives in what part.
    Very nice.

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  19. Pam and 09:47,

    According to Rebecca English, Apartment 1A has
    57 rooms in it's four stories.

    Apartment 1A has a total of 31,592 square feet while
    Clarence House has a total of 16,704 square feet.

    That is a lot of space.

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  20. Pam and 09:47,

    According to Rebecca English, Apartment 1A has
    57 rooms in it's four stories.

    Apartment 1A has a total of 31,592 square feet while
    Clarence House has a total of 16,704 square feet.

    That is a lot of space.

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    Replies
    1. Sarah Maryland USA3 August 2016 at 21:59

      But it would seem with that many rooms they would be small and closed off from one another. I'm an advocate for the open floor concept so you can see from the living room through the dining room into the kitchen
      I like big open spaces and not 57 rooms because even if KP is big I can't imagine the Roma being that big of there are so many of them

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    2. I've read 20-something rooms (at this time). Once upon a time, I believe it did have more than twice that, but I cannot narrow down exactly when it was redesigned. There was a fire in Jan 1963...

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    3. I agree that 57 rooms is about 45 too many. But I am not a fan of open concept homes. It baffles me that some people want to sit in a living room, with formal furniture, looking at their stove and fridge. No matter how high end appliances might be, they are still appliances and don't go with say, a velvet sofa. I will say though that some of the 57 rooms, could be opened from small rooms to bigger ones. But I still wouldn't want my living room, dining room and kitchen to be all one.

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    4. Royal fan,

      I have read more than one article that says 57 and in one of them they even specified what William and Kate were using them for. There are lights in the basement and attic in the first photo. They may use 22 rooms on the two middle floors for family activities but I believe they have employee quarters, luggage storage, etc. in the other rooms. I will try to find that article and also Rebecca English did an article in the Daily Mail around 2013 that tells of the 57 rooms.

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    5. 22:27, I do agree that many of the rooms may not qualify as true living space. But I think that the rooms that *do* qualify are a good size. Look at the photos here; the room appears to have four windows.

      One of my visits to KP included an exhibit in Apartment 1A and the rooms (on the main floor, obviously) were quite large. 57 may seem like a palace (and I realize it is part of one!), but if the number is anywhere close to it, then there is no way that they are all similar in size to this one.

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    6. Richard Kay even said at the time they moved into 1A that there are 8 garages with that apartment.

      Delete
  21. Pam ,

    William and Kate also have Tam Na Ghar on the Balmoral estate.

    It is a picturesque, three bedroom cottage with many fireplaces. William used to entertain Kate there often during university and occasionally Pippa would accompany them there. I wonder if Kate decorated that cottage also. I read where William had done some renovations there back in the day to make it more posh for Kate. Did she have any input then? My guess is yes. He even added a hot tub apparently.

    Concerning Apartment 1A, to access Apartment 1A, you drive around to the back of the building and drive through the beautiful archway of the Clock Tower, designed by Sir Christopher Wren in 1689. It is a very, very beautiful, majestic entrance. Then, once through the archway, to your right is Apartment 1A. Directly in front of you would be the state apartments, with the three windows of the elaborate King's Staircase looking onto 1A and also the windows of Princess Caroline's Drawing Room doing the same. I can easily understand why William and Kate chose 1A. 57 available rooms, very large and private courtyard, the Clock Tower entrance. Excellent choice.

    Does anyone know what would be to the left once you
    go through the Clock Tower entrance?

    Also, does anyone know if the white latticed patio that was there at 1A before has been enclosed or is it still there? It is very accessible to the public. I doubt that William and Kate would have left it that way at all. It is on the backside of 1A. I am astonished that Princess Margaret designed that there and in that way. For security, William and Kate could not have left it that. Funny, we haven't heard anything about that though.

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  22. Love the style of the rooms. A couple of comments. First does anyone know where the piano is located in the room at KP? Second on the table behind the couch at KP the photos are all turned so all you see is the frame backs. I wonder if they turned them on purpose for this night only, that scene on the sofa table looks odd to me. Thanks for the post. ali

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    Replies
    1. Looking at the first pic of the visit the piano would be right behind the photographer's back.

      Delete
    2. Yes, the piano is behind William (seated), in the corner near the window.

      Regarding the photos...I believe the photos on the table (behind where Kate and Michelle are seated) are intended to be seen when you enter the room, and not when you're sitting on the sofa with your back to them.

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    3. Anon 21:20 Thank you. I love music and have family that play the piano, classical pieces, quite beautifully. We have a grand and it is used:) I hope the piano gets some use from family or guests, though I have to say I assume this room is really only used for official visits.

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    4. Julia from Leominster4 August 2016 at 01:29

      To me it would be odd if they didn't face towards the back of the sitting room since that is where they would be seen as someone walks by. If they face the sofa, people's back would be towards them when they were sitting down and it would be hard to have a close look because the sofa would be in the way. Since they didn't hide the other photos, I don't know that they would hide these, although I suppose they could be private snaps the public hasn't seen. Hope this makes sense.

      I have a table behind my sofa but don't have any photos on it for this reason but even so, some of my china pieces are facing away from the sofa.

      Delete
  23. Annette New Zealand3 August 2016 at 19:32

    Princess Margaret's decorating tastes were very conventional for the time and not at all homely. (I can't imagine her wearing jeans!) Kate's tastes appear to be much more modern and eclectic than both Margaret's and Mary and Frederic's choices as seen here. The Danish rooms are quite a bit grander with their crystal chandeliers, but certainly these photos weren't taken in the more private quarters of the Copenhagen palace. Personally the British royal family decorating tastes are a bit too cluttered for me, with so many personal photographs around! Queen Victoria's rooms as seen in photographs were simply over the top with casts of children's hands etc as well as dozens of family paintings. I agree that "The Negro Page" seems to be a rather unfortunate choice to have on the wall when the US President and his wife were visiting. However perhaps we are being too politically correct. It is a fact of life that Britain grew rich on the slave trade and we can't ignore that unfortunate bit of history. Also people in the sixteenth and seventeenth century liked exotic references like this, hence inclusion in paintings of people and items from the Far East, Arabia and Africa.

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    Replies
    1. So true Annette. I might have swapped the paining out as it is so front and center in the room. I suspect there was a bit of discussion about it. It is an important piece of art from another era. These things are always tricky. Frankly, the name would have been the least of my concerns. I wonder if the name really was swapped out or if that is just speculation in a "press" story. ali

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    2. Annette, I agree that the sitting room at KP Apt 1A seems to be a bit cluttered, and the styles not terribly cohesive. For example, I don't like the combination of the ultra modern with the ultra over-the-top traditional. In order to bring the traditional and modern together, you have to moderate both ends of the spectrum and keep it simple.

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    3. Rebecca - Sweden4 August 2016 at 12:24

      I see no use in trying to hide the past. As Michelle Obama said, she wakes up every day in a building buildt by slaves. It's a part of history and I doubt the Obamas would be offended by that name on the piece of art. If it was named recently, absolutley. But not as an old piece of art.

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  24. The page... or a black prince of an exotic land? Another Kate thing is hidden in this painting? I would not be surprise if, being allowed to put my nose inside this room today, the painting was a different one... It seems so fitting for their guests, Obama and Michelle, with the elegant gesture of the young boy, holding the reins with great aplomb, with the dog sitting quietly in front of him, he looks the real subject of this beautiful group.

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    Replies
    1. The painting actially is named "The negro page" and it is said they had to remove the title before the particular visit. So no black prince ans no extra choosing for the visit.

      Delete
    2. He may have been a prince of an exotic land, but his task would put him in a position of at least servitude and probably slavery. I don't think a prince would be holding someone's horse.

      The dog looks like our greyhound who died a few years ago. He was a lovely dog; couldn't hunt his way out of a paper bag. The only hunting he did was for his dinner bowl! When he decided to run, though, he was poetry in motion. Our Jack Russell used to chase him, and the greyhound would run away but keep close until our JRT would get near and then he'd turn on the afterburners and leave him in the dust. Beautiful to see.

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    3. In fact, seeing the page, with his beautiful demeanor, I thought of Michelle's words about the slaves working to build the White House. With those words, she traced a straight line from the slavery of their ancestors to the freedom and opportunities given to her daughters. The dignity and beauty of this young servant makes him look like a prince. He became slave for an incident, but his human dignity, his elegance and beauty is showing through.

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    4. Paola, others may disagree, but I think you did it again. Such an unusual painting, (not my favorite), but unusual enough with the black Prince in such a pre-eminent position as to confirm your opinion. Strange painting though.

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    5. I do not think the painting was at all a Kate thing...Kate adds a few touches, as the Queen and many other Royal and political figures do for official visits or trips (pins, a tie/scarf, choice of a print, a few things on a desk etc.) Assume the painting is a permanent part of the room.

      Delete
    6. Julia from Leominster4 August 2016 at 02:11

      Yes, African pages were a fashion at the era of this painting and later - there is one in the opera Rosencavalier - although sometimes played by boys of any race these days - it is meant to be set around a century later. As pointed out, This type of painting was very popular -and was intended to show off what someone's wealth could buy - their hunting dogs, their splendid horses and their ability to afford an exotic servant - which could explain why the possessions have more prominence than the people. I'm thinking of other later British artists like Wootton.

      The palace art historians apparently don't know here whether this is of that type, (and the gentleman named above) or simply a very grand genre scene instead of a specific commission.

      The horses clearly belong to the gentleman and probably his groom or adult servant who are standing off to the right while the page holds their mounts.

      I don't think the Obamas would have been offended - the painting is clearly of its time and a stunning work - but since the picture has an alternative title simply describing the contents of dogs, horses and page - changing the frame plaque would probably have been wise when it was hung.

      If it was in fact designed to show off a wealthy man's possessions it is quite an apt choice for a prince's flat though I suspect William and Kate were more attracted to the horses and the dogs. (Such scenes aren't uncommon either - most stately homes would have similar type scenes of horses although not always beautiful as this.)

      Bluhare love your tale of your greyhound - what a joyful scene that must have been. Was he a rescued racing dog? I have to confess my spaniels love to try to hunt although it is strongly discouraged. (And I do have watercolours of them in my sitting room - but just because I love them so much.)

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    7. My Border Collie loves to run, too.Usually in circles.

      Could that standing dog be a Russian Wolfhound?

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    8. Paola, a lovely thought. I do think it likely Kate just liked the painting, however.
      I agree. The room could have been "staged" somewhat,specifically for the guests, although probably not much. The gift toys, for example.
      It seems to be a formal reception room, not a private family area. It may have
      small changes, according to who is being received.

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    9. Paola, I agree. Thanks for always being on the lookout. :)

      Delete
    10. Julia, yes, he was a rescued racing dog, although he was so big and clumsy they didn't even try to train him to race. He was our third rescued greyhound, and the goofiest one of the lot. It was so funny seeing our JRT trying to chase him down and failing every time. It certainly kept him fit, though!

      The best greyhound story I have, though, concerns our second dog. We got him when he was 5, and retired from the track. He must have been really good to have lasted that long; I think 5 is mandatory retirement. Anyway, not long after we got him, he got away from my husband and ran out the front door. He almost gave one of the neighbors a heart attack as he was driving down the street -- and overtaken by a greyhound. Guy said he did a double take as he saw a blur outside his car and realized it was our dog!! He was an amazing dog; died at age 16, which is very old for the breed.

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    11. This painting struck me like a double meaning image, because of the position of the owner. In fact, if the painter wanted to represent a trophy, why put the owner in such a secondary position? I think instead that the painter "saw" the beauty and the dignity of this page, and he wanted in some way pay a homage to this dignity, showing the young black man as if he was the boss and the owner the servant. A prince can hold the reins of his own horse! There is, in history, something to explain this sort of exchange of roles. In ancient Rome, slavery was seen in a different way than in America, because not only black people was in slavery: anybody could become slave, for debts for instance. There was one day (Saturnalia) in which slaves and owners exchanged their roles, and this was the origin of Carnival. It was done because each one had to remember that "today you are the master, but tomorrow who knows?". The same message I saw in this painting, a prince can be hidden in every servant. It is a meaning fitting also to the Cambridge family, the miner's daughter hidden in Kate is always present beside the Duchess. Something like "Last we forget": maybe she put the painting in her house thinking of herself... But maybe my fantasy is too strong and you are right, it was just a chance. A beautiful chance indeed!

      Delete
    12. Your explanation is just as plausible as anyone else's Paola, lol. Thanks for the information.
      What do you think of the cloud formations?
      Google his "Cows in the River" and the "Cows by the River". Notice the clouds.

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    13. Anon 22:04, if you google "A pastoral landscape with cattle resting, a river beyond" you will see another couple of holes in the clouds! It seems a sort of signature, maybe he once observed such a disposition in real clouds and decided that it would be a good "personal mark" in a genre painting which was very usual at his time.

      Delete
    14. As to the "Black prince": the page is holding the reins of both horses, so you can see definitely what is his role: a page, not the owner of the horse. I saw that also in other paintings Cuyps used to put the owners in the background, showing cattle as main subjects for instance. In the other hand, at this time (17th century) seeing black people in our countries was not common, and having a black servant was a great status symbol; we must consider, besides, that black people was not connected with the idea of slavery, they gave instead an idea of exoticism, and the image of an exotic prince was not far from the eye of a 17th century's observer. At this time, black people started to be present in Holland, and some historicist found that their status was very various, from slavery to aristocracy. You can read some interesting report if you google "Black Africans in Seventeenth-Century Amsterdam". The age of the page lowers the idea of a servant in a very submitted position: being a page was a fitting employment for young noblemen.

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    15. The positions of the various animals amplifies the effect. The master's beautiful horse and hound face the page. Another dog looks to the groom who stands behind his mottled horse. Off to the side are cows surveying the scene. Taken altogether, the animals are the most numerous beings in the painting, twice as many as the humans, and they form a circle around the page. They, with the round and square towers in the background, make up the environmental structure of the painting. The rather amused glance of the page himself as well as that of his horse, seems fixed on the little mutt who looks poised to jump up as soon as his master moves to mount his horse. Perhaps the page feels a kinship with this animal, or perhaps he just enjoys its behavior. In any case, the animals are much more a part of the story than the two adult humans who have stopped the action for the moment and lapsed into the background. It is a pastoral scene with an urban background, rustically typical of its era. Interesting that it was purchased by George IV, whose tastes were extremely ornate.

      When I looked at the cows in the painting, I noticed the vegetation the brown one appears to be munching. Are those cabbages, with more open heads than our modern cabbages, or are they some other plant? They seem to be a fairly important part of the scene.

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    16. I checked back here just by chance and I'm so glad I did! Another great dog
      story from bluhare and an expansion of her painting interpretation by Paola.
      As Kate is an art major, I am sure she put a great deal of thought into her
      choices. Yes, she chose this painting because she liked it-for a reason
      beautifully interpreted by Paola
      anon 16:05

      Delete
    17. paola 07:48- in fact, it was quite common for young noblemen to be pages in the
      homes of Dukes, for example. I believe Prince Richard of Gloucester, later
      Richard III of England, was a page in a relative's household.Even today, it is a custom and considered an honor for aristocratic women to serve as ladies in waiting to the queen.
      We saw a somewhat similar event to parts of Saturnalia and Carnival on Downton Abbey with the Gilly's Ball. The servants dressed in their finery and danced with family members.

      Delete
    18. Anon 14:49: there is a great example of a nowadays "Saturnalia": the Christmas party the Queen offers to her staff. The RF is involved, and they dance with the staff.
      Well, I think that the choice of this painting was really perfect for the occasion, and it can be seen as another "Kate thing"!

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    19. I agree. :)

      Delete
    20. If an aide noticed the title of the painting at the last minute, isn't it possible that a painting with horses had been requested from the Royal Collection especially for the occasion, and this is what they sent? It could have been chosen especially for the President's visit, since Prince George was to ride the Obamas' gift horse. On the other hand, the painting fits the space and is in keeping with the colors and feel of the room, so perhaps it was chosen when the room was furnished. Hard to know, but I do think it was kind to allow the little prince to stay awake to greet the visitors. He may not remember it, but the picture will always be a reminder. And I wonder whether there were other gifts in the room, perhaps including the book on the table, or even a wedding gift from the President.

      Delete
    21. 05:52,

      What do you think the Obama's gave William and Kate? Probably a state gift and also a personal one. I remember Michelle saying they had watched the Royal wedding and that they had been very moved by that.

      Delete
  25. Does anyone else think the clouds in the painting seem a little odd?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anon @ 23:32,

      Yes, so much so that I google his other art work, and wouldn't you know it, he has another painting with clouds in that strange "two holes in them" configuration. The other one is entitled "Cows in a River" from 1654. AND, there is another, different painting, that has the same clouds also, called "Cows by the River". That one some think was done by a different artist later in the 1800's but the clouds
      are the same.

      No offense, but I don't like the painting Kate chose even without considering the two holes in the clouds.

      It would be fun to know how much of an inventory she had to choose from and how that process works. That would be a great blog topic, hint, hint. :)

      Did she get to work with the very knowledgable and fun top curator of the palaces and Royal stuff, Lucy Worsly? Hopefully. Lucy is in charge of Kensington Palace, the Tower of London, etc.? Kate, being an Art History graduate, should get along splendidly with an art history expert like Lucy. I am sure they know each other.

      Anyone who enjoys Royal history and art history would throughly enjoy the many special programs
      that Lucy has on You Tube. Just go to You Tube and then google her name. You will NOT be disappointed. She makes learning about history very entertaining. She definitely knows her stuff and presents it in a spunky and humorous way.

      In conclusion, I would definitely not have chosen "Negro Page". I feel certain Kate had many options
      so it is curious to me why she chose that particular painting. I like most of her other choices, as I usually do. Kate does a great job all around. Kudos to her.

      Thanks for this blog, Charlotte.

      Delete
    2. The clouds in the painting do seem a little odd.

      Delete
    3. Julia from Leominster5 August 2016 at 06:11

      I'm certain there were conferences between Kate, the curators and whoever was helping her decorate the apartment. Worth remembering too that while the royal collection is enormous, it doesn't cover all periods of art - this is a period it is particularly rich in. It is also extremely suitable for Kensington Palace which was first a royal home to William and Mary. William of course was Dutch -and Kensington Palace dates from the same century as the painting - if Kate had history in mind, this may very well have been her reasoning.

      To my eyes this is simply a stunning painting, particularly in richness and composition but the appeal most likely also came from the wonderful depiction of dogs and horses. I don't think it needed to have been so controversial if the title plaque had been changed - the title of the painting seems to have varied and sometimes just been called a page, dogs and horses.

      Delete
    4. I did research those reference and the clouds are the same. What was up with that.

      Delete
    5. Kate does come up with some strange idiosyncrasies sometimes. There isn't much information on the painter but the three paintings
      have the same peculiar cloud formations. Another "Kate thing"?

      Delete
  26. Thanks for this very interesting post, but I have one small correction. The interior designer's name is Ben Pentreath (some of the letters are transposed in the reference to him above) He has a stunningly beautiful blog with photos of his homes in London and Devon for those who'd like to see more of his style - well worth googling!

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  27. Bluhare, beautiful indeed. Thanks for sharing...brought back some dog memories for me!

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  28. Hi, I enjoy checking your Duchess Kate blog and catching up on the family's life. Just a quick editing note: You wrote "How does one marry the needs of a palace which will host heads of state with providing homely surroundings for two growing children?" Maybe 'homely' means 'homey' in Great Britain, but 'homely' in the US means not very attractive. Did you mean 'homey' as in comfortable or familiar as a home (Merriam-Webster). Just curious if our "being separated by a common language" includes the use of 'homely.' Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, in Britain 'homely' is equivalent to American 'homey.'

      Delete
    2. Julia from Leominster5 August 2016 at 05:37

      I believe there is a different between British and US English here - homely as used means someplace comfortable as is comfortable for raising a family - the same idea as homey.

      Delete
    3. Homely is an insult when applied to a person. It means someone who is plump and not particularly attractive. Wallis Simpson might have called Queen Elizabeth (the QM) homely.

      Delete
  29. Alejandra Ramírez4 August 2016 at 05:12

    Excellent post! Decorating a space, even a small is a feat and Catherine has done a wonderful job! Although not a 1000000% my taste, it looks amazing! :)
    Thanks for the post!

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  30. Lovely post! Charlotte, are you planning on updating Kate Loves: Tiaras or Jewelry?? Just curious, thanks!

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  31. a possible tour date September 28 confirmed by hello magazine hmm and the William kate and harry send wish to the team gb

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  32. Tammy from California4 August 2016 at 16:42

    Okay friends, I know it's completely off topic BUT: I have said many times on this blog that I am a horrible dresser which is why I never pick anything for Kate to wear, I just vote. WELL today I found something I thought looked like her style, the model has a similar body to her's and I think it's cute. So just for fun, completely out of left field, here's what I saw:

    http://www.anthropologie.com/anthro/product/clothes-new/4130385730022.jsp#/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good find Tammy! Cute and flirty with nice detail on the tiers....and it's lace too!! :) Love the store! cc

      Delete
    2. Oh, I have a feeling Kate would like it, Tammy. :) I like one or two myself! Thanks for the link.

      Delete
    3. Yes, that dress would be lovely on Kate! Apparently you've been hiding your great eye from us, Tammy. :-)

      Delete
    4. I LOVE Anthropologie dresses! I often think when I browse through them at the store that I can picture Kate wearing many of them. It seems though that most of the styles are quite casual. I can see her wearing those in private, or for more casual public appearances. (The "Far Fields Maxi" dress is one that is similar to the dresses she wore on the India trip, while I can see her wearing the Garden Grid Sheath" dress for a public daytime engagement) .

      Delete
  33. Tammy from California4 August 2016 at 16:49

    I have a question for the English friends on this blog: what attributes make a living space called an "apartment"? Here in California an apartment is typically a one to 3 bedroom place, that has just enough space to live in, cook in and house your things. It is not grand like the apartments shown above and you can never own it, you only rent it. Here, this would be called a house. Just wondering the difference for anyone who would like to give me a lesson :)

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    Replies
    1. Julia from Leominster5 August 2016 at 05:53

      Apologies if this is a duplicate - my computer got hungry.

      The type of residence you're describing is called a flat in Britain or if multiple - a block of flats.

      An apartment is mainly used for living quarters in a single residence such as a palace - hence it's use for Kensington Palace. But it is also used for residences within a stately home that has been divided up either by lease or by purchase. (I know someone who lives in such a place - lovely!) To add to the confusion, the Albany on Piccadilly refers to elegant residences of this sort as "sets" - where I would also love to keep a flat - that is, set - in my dreams - except I'm not certain they allow dogs.

      Once, I think they may have been some distinction made for the two words as to whether services were offered - that is what's today a service flat, or if they were self-catering. These days, unless you're very rich, there aren't likely to be services beyond perhaps a cleaner.

      Delete
    2. Tammy 16:49. also see my August 4, 21:38 comment. It somehow made its way
      down into the Lucy Worsly thread.

      Delete
  34. Dr. Lucy Worsly is a dynamo. She is Chief Curator of Royal Palaces. She oversaw the €12,000,000 renovation of Kensington Palace. She earned her BA at Oxford and her PhD. from the University of Sussex, doing a doctoral thesis on the Earl of Cavendish including his influence and historical importance of Manage'. Horse management for war maneuvers. Like the "dancing" horses of Vienna. Cavendish was a primary proponent of that.

    The lady knows her stuff because it obviously is her passion. Anything I find on You Tube that involves her I watch. There is a good one that gives an unusual account of a young Queen Victoria in Kensington Palace. (I will list the title later.) It is an excellent documentary, of course, as Lucy is contributed to a lot of it. I'm a fan. Can you tell? There is no such thing as dull history with her. yay

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  35. This was a very interesting article - especially in light of the fact that my family is part Danish. My Danish family was very proud and VERY involved with their homes and the decorating and upkeep of those homes. (My great aunt actually walked around our home and ran her fingers over the sills! And my mom was obsessed with cleaning and decorating: Queen Anne-style furniture - colonial for us kids, expensive matching wallpaper in every room, summer and winter rugs, etc.) So I'm hardly surprised that Duchess Kate sought out the Danish royals' advice. And what an amazing room from Amalienborg Palace you've included! So light and airy! And eclectic but very tasteful. The ambient light (from the the window and candelabra) is lovely, with a few tasteful lamps here and there. I am of the same opinion: practical lighting fixtures in the ceiling for ambient light is good and can be raised or lowered befitting the occasion. But a decorative, sculpted lamp is a statement - and can also be very distracting or uncomfortable if placed in the wrong location...or replicated too often. I would rather have a lovely wall mirror to reflect light, or even a mirrored wall if the room size is small. The objective is to not feel "closed in" and, of course, to not be blinded by glare.

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  36. I have the greatest respect for Lucy Worsly. She has made some very interesting documetaries. Well worth watching.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alimai,

      Lucy Worsly should receive an Emmy for her documentary work, if she hasn't already. She is easily that good. Her videos are the best. I highly recommend her videos also. I hope she does more soon.
      also Alimai.

      Delete
    2. Balbina - Austria9 August 2016 at 05:03

      Wow, I am excited now. I am also a huge fan of Lucy Worsley. Might that be another connecting element of people interested in Kate and the BRF? She is intelligent, knowledgeable, funny and entertaining. I find all her documentaries utterly enjoyable. Actually, I would like to put her in my sitting room and listen to her stories at least once a week. She is a real treasure!

      Delete
    3. Balbina,

      I am sure Lucy and Kate know each other, aren't you? and I hope they get to be good friends if they aren't already. Lucy's offices occupied Apartment 1A prior to William and Kate moving in. And Lucy was the one who did the overall renovation of Kensington Palace.

      Lucy most likely was the one that Kate had to work with to get any antique furniture or artwork from the Royal Collection to decorate 1A or Amner Hall

      Kate and Lucy, two gems of the Royal team.

      Delete
    4. Balbina - Austria10 August 2016 at 21:28

      That's interesting. Thanks for the info Anon 23:38. I knew about Lucy's involvement in the renovation of K. Palace, but I did't know her office was located in apartment A1.

      Never thougt of it before, but you are right. They most likely are acquaintance, perhaps even friends. Two art historian, living and working at the most interesting places. Very likely indeed. What an inspiering collaboration this must be.

      Delete
    5. Balbina,

      I don't know if Lucy's (executive) office was there, per se, but her employees offices were (and storage). I would assume hers was also as she seems like an on-site type of gal to me.

      Delete
  37. Tammy- I think "apartment" is used in the separate living space within a larger area sense. The king's apartments, for example, would indicate his private rooms within the palace.The various areas are contiguous and would not be thought of as separate houses.
    That's my take, at any rate.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Did anyone else think that the carpet under the conversational group at Apt. 1A is the one shown in Princess Margaret's blue room?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did at first...I admit it. :) But the pattern and colors are different.

      Delete
  39. Thanks to all on the suggestion of viewing documentaries by Lucy Worsly!!! Think I have just hit a treasure trove!! Thank you for sharing that information. :) cc

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed you have, cc. You are welcome. Enjoy.

      Delete
  40. Did anyone else notice the similarities in Mrs. Obama's dress, to the beautiful beige dress the Dutchess wore at a previous meeting with the Obama's? Granted Mrs. Obama looked rather dowdy next to the Duchess and probably didn't want to make that dress mistake again. But to imitate so exactly I find bizarre.

    ReplyDelete

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